Tom Schreiter – Page 2 – BigAlBooks.com

All posts by Tom Schreiter

What your prospects would really like to know.

When I do my live workshops, I don’t spend any time talking about my credentials.

The workshop participants don’t care about my credentials. And, they are right not to care. My credentials won’t make them a cent.

I’ve written many books on how to sponsor distributors. But, even though I wrote those books, not a single workshop participant will earn an extra dollar on their bonus checks. Even if my credentials included a Ph.D. degree in Networking, my credentials don’t mean a thing.

Why?

The workshop attendees don’t want to know about credentials, they want to know about experiences.

Book theory and my personal bank account balance won’t put money in the workshop participants’ pockets. Real life experiences, case studies, proven “real world” strategies and techniques are what distributors want to hear.

The same principle applies to sponsoring.

What don’t your prospects want to know?

  • They don’t want to know how big of a car you drive.
  • They don’t want to know how big your bonus check was last month.
  • They don’t care how many heavy-hitter awards you have won.

All these things are things you accomplished. Your prospects may not believe they have the same skills or abilities to match your accomplishments.

So, what do your prospects want to know about?

Experiences.

They want to know how you helped other distributors become successful. They would like to hear about other people in similar circumstances that have been helped by you to become successful.

If you’re successful in networking, you should have lots of these real life experiences to share with prospects. Your sponsoring presentations will be easy.

What if you’re not successful in networking, or just starting? What should you do then?

Sounds like a great time to start building your successful experiences. Instead of sponsoring wide, wide, wide, why not concentrate on your best distributor? Put some extra effort into helping your distributor make it to the top.

Once you have your first success story, move on to your next. You’ll soon get the reputation of “somebody who makes people successful.”

That’s a great reputation to own. And, prospects will be attracted to you.

How to avoid long presentations.

Q. What do all of your presentations have in common?

A. They all offer time freedom and money freedom.

You will never have a prospect tell you:

“Oh, I don’t want to join because I don’t want any of that time freedom or money freedom. I think I’d like more debt, less money, and more time at work.”

Sounds silly, doesn’t it?

Well, if all of your prospects want time freedom and money freedom, and your presentation offers time freedom and money freedom, then why don’t all of your prospects join?

Because they don’t have the confidence that they can personally achieve time freedom and money freedom with your opportunity. Sure, you can do it, but they don’t think THEY can do it.

Now here is the key. When prospects don’t have the confidence that they have the skills necessary for our opportunity, here is what most people do:

They start introducing new benefits.

They tell the prospect about three-way calls, nice brochures, perfect videos, fancy meetings, car bonuses, and lots of other nice benefits. But they are missing the point.

The prospect doesn’t think he can do it, so it doesn’t matter how good the benefits are.

The solution?

Instead of talking about more benefits, concentrate on showing your prospect how SIMPLE it can be to do your business.

What makes you attractive?

It’s easy to see why some sponsors do well and why some struggle.

  • Would you want a motivated or an unmotivated sponsor?
  • Would you want a positive or a negative sponsor?
  • Would you join a sponsor who made negative comments about others?
  • Would you join a sponsor who complained about the company?
  • Would you join a sponsor who tried to convince you that every company in our industry is bad except one?

Prospects don’t want to join a sponsor who criticizes and complains about others. The prospects see this sponsor as having low self-esteem and a low self-image.

Time to go to night school?

What do we know about people who attend night school?

1. They have a job. That is why they are going to school at night.
2. They live locally.
3. They want to get ahead in life.
4. They probably want to earn more money.

Want good local prospects? Maybe you should consider going to night school and be surrounded by great prospects.

“Nobody listens to me” and other pathetic excuses.

I was in Brooklyn, NY for Father’s Day. A man came to the training.

He was from Africa. He only spoke French.

And he was building his business in New York City.

Think about it. How hard would that be?

And yet a person who has lived in America all his life will say:

“I can’t build my business. Nobody listens to me.”

And for the young man from Africa, consider this:

Nobody can listen to him. They don’t understand him.

But, he is building while our American distributor is complaining.

So is it the circumstances that hold us back? Or is it how we choose to feel about our circumstances?

The young man from Africa has chosen to build his business even if circumstances are less than ideal. Our American distributor is looking for someone to solve his problems. He refuses to even try unless someone else makes sure no problems will be in his way.

I see distributors with no cars, distributors building while a war is dividing their country, and distributors who travel thousands of miles to learn the skills to make their dreams come true.

Bottom line?

It is easier to find someone with desire and teach them the skills, than to find someone with skills and teach them desire.

Use presentations for training, not closing.

During a conference training call, I only had 30 minutes to talk, just enough time to irritate the listeners by telling them that their presentations were useless.

They protested by saying their prospects were different. Their prospects would make the final decision to join their business based upon … (and this is funny) … FACTS!

So I challenged them about some of the killer facts they had about their business. Here are some of the facts and my comments:

* “We are the 17th largest MLM company in the world.” – Gee, if size mattered, why wouldn’t the prospect join one of the 16 companies larger than you?

* “We are the 37th fastest growing company in the INC 500 list.” – Wow. Why should I take a slow grower like you when I could pick an even faster grower? I’ve got 36 better candidates to choose from.

* “Our product is patented.” – Let’s see. About a few million other products are patented, too. And most patents require an investment of a few hundred dollars to get the paperwork. Not too impressive.

* “We pay out a full 50% in our compensation plan.” – Well, if I should make a decision based upon percentage payout of a compensation plan, then maybe I should join one of the hundreds of programs that pay out more than 50%.

* “We are a 17-year-old debt-free company.” – If length of time was the decision factor, shouldn’t I join a company that is older than yours? And wouldn’t debt-free mean that your accounting department didn’t know how to use leverage to lower its costs? Ouch.

* “Our chief scientist taught at a prestigious medical school.” – This sounds more like, “My scientist can beat up your scientist.” So should I join a company who has a better scientist who got some cool awards, or maybe even a Nobel Prize?

* “Our management team has 84 years of combined networking experience.” – Well, I have 60 years of dieting experience, and that doesn’t make me thin. So are you telling me that I should join a different company who has a management team with more than 84 years of networking experience?

* “Our secret ingredient has more antioxidants than their secret ingredient.” – So if I join your company, and I find another company that has 2 more units of antioxidants, then I will have to quit your company and join them?

Okay, starting to see a pattern yet? I’m sure you get the point. It is not the facts in our presentation that affect our prospects’ decisions.

Stop using presentations to get prospects to make decisions. Instead, learn the skills of how to close and how to do our business instead of living in some fantasy world where we think that facts make a difference.

As a wise man once said, “Figure it out.”

People are lazy.

I get a lot of emails from people asking, “There is a lot to learn in network marketing. 25 skills is a lot. Can you just give me one quick tip so that I will be rich?”

How do you respond to that?

It seems to be a natural tendency for humans to look for shortcuts and instant success. They don’t want to do what it takes to be successful. They only want the rewards.

What if your doctor took that attitude? Not sure I would trust that doctor with my health.

You have to plant seeds and cultivate before you harvest.

Network marketing offers a lot. Social networks, a community, personal development, and a part-time hobby. It can also offer a massive income, but there is an investment of time, money, and energy.

What to do before you look for great prospects.

Most of the questions I get have to do with who to talk to and how to talk to them.

Searching for good prospects is secondary.

Knowing how to talk to prospects is primary.

No matter how good the prospect is, we can say the wrong words. I had years of experience doing just that. Too many distributors try to fix their bad choice of words by finding new and better prospects to ruin. Not exactly a good plan.

Better words means you can capture more potential prospects. It’s just that simple.

Do you have low-level or high-level communications?

Many distributors communicate at the lower levels of communication. To improve our sponsoring, we should try to communicate at the higher levels.

Here are the levels, starting at the lowest level:

1. An email or text message. Hard to make any kind of connection.

2. A webpage, video, or brochure. Slightly better, but not by much.

3. A phone call. Ooooh, much better. You get two-way communication, feedback, and can address the prospects’ questions instantly.

4. A video call. You can get feedback and see the expression on your prospects’ faces. You can even watch them roll their eyes and fall asleep.

5. Person-to-person. Total body language feedback and more.

But the very highest level of communication?

6. Person-to-person over food. No one ever gets mad at you over food. Meet someone for lunch or over coffee to ensure great, friendly presentations.

Worry about what you can control.

“Your character is what you really are, while reputation is merely what others think you are.” — John Wooden

This famous basketball coach simply asked his players to perform to the best of their ability. He told them not to worry about the opposing players because they could only control themselves. If they played hard, the outcome of the game would normally be in their favor. They could not control if the other team had a lucky game.

It’s the same in network marketing. Don’t worry about the outside influences that you cannot control. Instead, worry about what you can control — your own personal performance.

And learn the hard-core skills of communicating to people. Instead of idle chit-chat or talking or presenting, learning exactly how to communicate to their subconscious mind’s programs is the skill we should concentrate on.

If you commit to performing to the best of your ability, your bonus checks will take care of themselves.